syslog – UDP local to rsyslog and send remote with TCP and compression

This article is to show how to log Nginx’s access logs locally using UDP to the local rsyslog daemon, which will send the logs to a remote rsyslog server using TCP and compression. In general, logs could generate a lot of traffic and using UDP over distant locations could result in packet loss respectively logs’ lines loss. The idea here is to log messages locally using UDP (non-blocking way) to a local Syslog server, which will send the stream to a remote central Syslog server using TCP connections to be sure no packets are lost. In addition, we are going to enable local caching (if the remote server is temporary unreachable) and compression between the two Syslog servers.
Our goal is to use

  • UDP for our client program (Nginx in the case) for non-blocking log writes.
  • TCP between our local machine and the remote syslog server – to be sure not to lose messages on bad connectivity.
  • local caching for our client machine – not to lose messages if the remote syslog is temporary unreachable.
  • compression between the local machine and the remote syslog server.

The configuration and the commands are tested on CentOS 7, CentOS 8 and Ubuntu 18 LTS. Check out UDP remote logging here – nginx remote logging to UDP rsyslog server (CentOS 7).

STEP 1) Configure client’s local rsyslog to accept UDP log messages only if the messages’ tags are “nginx”

Couple of things should be enabled in the local client-size rsyslog daemon:

  • rsyslog to accept UDP messages. Uncomment or add the following under section “Modules” (probably the first section in the file?) in /etc/rsyslog.conf
    $ModLoad imudp
    $UDPServerRun 514
    

    or

    module(load="imudp")
    input(type="imudp" port="514")
    

    The first is the old syntax, which is still supported and the second is the new syntax. For simplicity, all of the following configuration will be using the new syntax, because the old one is depricated.

  • Add a rule to catch the tag containing “nginx” and execute action to forward the messages to the remote server
    if ($syslogtag == 'nginx:') then {
    action(type="omfwd" target="10.10.10.10" port="10514" protocol="tcp" compression.Mode="single" ZipLevel="9"
    queue.filename="forwarding" queue.spoolDirectory="/var/log" queue.size="1000000" queue.type="LinkedList" queue.maxFileSize="1g" queue.SaveOnShutdown="on"
    action.resumeRetryCount="-1")
    & stop
    }
    
  • The options are almost self-explanatory, the important ones are there is no retry limit count of reconnecting to the server, there is in-disk cache of maximum 1G if the remote server is unavailable and the compression per message is turned on. More on actionshttps://www.rsyslog.com/doc/v8-stable/configuration/actions.html, the forward modulehttps://www.rsyslog.com/doc/v8-stable/configuration/modules/omfwd.html and the queuehttps://www.rsyslog.com/doc/v8-stable/rainerscript/queue_parameters.html

And restart the rsyslog:

systemctl restart rsyslog

Keep on reading!

simple squid proxy with http authorization

Squid (caching) proxy has been used on the Internet for ages. The first release of Squid was back in the mid-90s!
Here is how you may use Squid as a proxy HTTP server with user and password authorization (it is easy to enable the caching, but we do not include such configuration). Our system is CentOS 7, but the configuration part is platform-independent, so just install it in your Linux distribution and use our configuration lines.

STEP 1) Install Squid

The instalation under CentOS 7

yum install squid

STEP 2) Squid configuration to use it as web caching proxy.

The configuration file is located in “/etc/squid/squid.conf” and you should add at the begging the following lines:

#MY ADITIONAL CONFIG
visible_hostname srvname
auth_param basic program /usr/lib64/squid/basic_ncsa_auth /etc/squid/pass.squid
acl ncsa_users proxy_auth REQUIRED
http_access allow ncsa_users
auth_param basic program /usr/lib64/squid/basic_ncsa_auth /etc/squid/pass.squid

Keep on reading!

nginx remote logging to UDP rsyslog server (CentOS 7)

This article will present to you all the configuration needed to remotely save access logs of an Nginx web server. All the configuration from the client and server sides is included. The client and the server use CentOS 7 Linux distribution and the configuration could be used under different Linux distribution. Probably only Selinux rules are kind of specific to the CentOS 7 and the firewalld rules are specific for those who use it as a firewall replacing the iptables. Here is the summary of what to expect:

  • Client-side – nginx configuration
  • Server-side – rsyslog configuration to accept UDP connections
  • Server-side – selinux and firewall configuration

The JSON formatted logs may be sent to a Elasticsearch server, for example. Here is how to do it – send access logs in json to Elasticsearch using rsyslog

STEP 1) Client-side – the Nginx configuration.

Nginx configuration is pretty simple just a single line with the log template and the IP (and port if not default 514) of the rsyslog server. For the record, this is the official documentation https://nginx.org/en/docs/syslog.html. In addition it worth mentioning there could be multiple access_log directives in a single section to log simultaneously on different targets (and the templates may be different or the same). So you can set the access log output of a section locally and remotely.
Nginx configuration (probably /etc/nginx/nginx.conf or whatever is the organization of your Nginx configuration files.)

server {
     .....
     access_log      /var/log/nginx/example.com_access.log main;
     access_log      syslog:server=10.10.10.2:514,facility=local7,tag=nginx,severity=info main3;
     .....
}

The “main” and “main3” are just names of the logging templates defined earlier (you may check rsyslog remote logging – prevent local messages to appear to see an interesting Nginx logging template).
The error log also could be remotely logged:

error_log syslog:server=10.10.10.3 debug;

STEP 2) Server-side – rsyslog configuration to accept UDP connections.

Of course, if you have not installed the rsyslog it’s high time you installed it with (for CentOS 7):

yum install -y rsyslog

To enable rsyslog to listen for UDP connections your rsyslog configuration file (/etc/rsyslog.conf) must include the following:

$ModLoad imudp
$UDPServerRun 514

Most of the Linux distributions have these two lines commented so you just need to uncomment them by removing the “#” from the beginning of the lines. If the lines are missing just add them under section “MODULES” (it should be near the first lines of the rsyslog configuration file).
Change the 514 with the number you like for the UDP listening port.
Write the client’s incoming lines of information to a different location and prevent merging with the local log messages – rsyslog remote logging – prevent local messages to appear. Include as a first rule under the rules’ section starting with “RULES” of the rsyslog configuration file (/etc/rsyslog.conf):

# Remote logging
$template HostIPtemp,"/mnt/logging/%FROMHOST-IP%.log"
if ($fromhost-ip != "127.0.0.1" ) then ?HostIPtemp
& stop

Logs only of remote hosts are going to be saved under /mnt/logging/.log.
Keep on reading!