Patch and resume compilation of a failed package in Gentoo – ebuild, local repository or ctrl+Z

A dependency package failed to compile throwing error and existing the emerge of a queue with a hundred and more packages. Or worse you installed a new version of a package and multiple rebuilds are pulled, but one of the dependencies fails and you may end up with a broken system? What can you do? There is no new version of the failed package and yes, there is a bug in the Gentoo’s Bugzilla – https://bugs.gentoo.org/. And there is a solution with a patch, which has not made its way to the production and in Gentoo portage yet.
The package in the portage is broken, no new fixed package is released, but there is a patch to fix your issue. Here is what you can do:

  • Make your own package with the fixed version of the original package and put it in your local repository (not the official one, because on every emerge –sync it will be deleted). You should make a local repository and put the ebuild and all necessary files.
  • Or just download the patch and patch the source in the directory, which still holds the source of the failed package and resume the compilation manually. Then install it. Using this tutorial – Resume installation after a package build error, when emerging firefox under Gentoo
  • Just after the uncompress operation of the emerge press CTRL+Z to put the operation in the background and download and patch. Then bring back the emerge from the background with “fg” command.

The second and third options are not permanent solutions, but they are fast enough to be used in some situations.
Here are steps for the first and second option you may have:

OPTION 1) Make your own package.

Create a local repository (for details Simple steps to create Gentoo custom repository and add a package):

root@srv ~ # mkdir -p /var/db/repos/my-local-portage/{metadata,profiles}
root@srv ~ # cat  << 'EOF' > /var/db/repos/my-local-portage/metadata/layout.conf
masters = gentoo
auto-sync = false
EOF
root@srv ~ # cat  << 'EOF' > /etc/portage/repos.conf/my-local-portage.conf
[my-local-portage]
location = /var/db/repos/my-local-portage 
EOF
root@srv ~ # cat  << 'EOF' > /var/db/repos/my-local-portage/profiles/repo_name
my-local-portage
EOF

Copy the ebuild file of the package you want to modify in the custom repository directory created above (it’s a good idea to copy all the sub-directories, too):
Keep on reading!

Simple steps to create Gentoo custom repository and add a package

Creating a custom repository would give you a chance to fast edit (ebuild) files of existing packages and drop better versions to the custom repository, which then will be used to install in the system. Here is the simplest way to create a Gentoo custom repository without installing any mandatory software. You may check the two Gentoo articles on the subject – https://wiki.gentoo.org/wiki/Custom_repository, which uses repoman (and additional software to install) and https://wiki.gentoo.org/wiki/Handbook:AMD64/Portage/CustomTree#Defining_a_custom_repository, which is part of a bigger article and without a clear example with a package as we are going to show.
Our custom repository name is “my-local-portage”.

STEP 1) Create the directories and basic configuration files for the new custom repository

Just two mandatory directories.

mkdir -p /var/db/repos/my-local-portage/{metadata,profiles}

The minimal configuration in two files:

cat  << 'EOF' > /var/db/repos/my-local-portage/metadata/layout.conf
masters = gentoo
auto-sync = false
EOF
cat  << 'EOF' > /var/db/repos/my-local-portage/profiles/repo_name
my-local-portage
EOF

Fix the permissions

chown -R portage:portage /var/db/repos/my-local-portage

The custom repository is set up. Now only the emerge should get the configuration to check for it in the next step.

STEP 2) Portage global configuration.

Add a file pointing for your custom repository in the Portage global configuration directory “/etc/portage”:

cat  << 'EOF' > /etc/portage/repos.conf/my-local-portage.conf
[my-local-portage]
location = /var/db/repos/my-local-portage
EOF

STEP 3) Add a package in the new custom repository.

The package version may be the same version as in the official Gentoo repository, but the package form the custom repository will be used if no repository is included in the “emerge” command.
For simplicity, we are going not to modify the ebuild file of a copied official package, but the idea is to copy an existing ebuild file and then change it for the user’s needs and the steps are the same as follow.
Just copy the file (and edit it). The package “app-text/calibre” was randomly selected for the example.

mkdir /var/db/repos/my-local-portage/app-text/calibre
cp /usr/portage/app-text/calibre/calibre-4.9.1-r1.ebuild /var/db/repos/my-local-portage/app-text/calibre/

Create the manifest files and you are ready:

cd /var/db/repos/my-local-portage/app-text/calibre/
ebuild calibre-4.9.1-r1.ebuild manifest
>>> Downloading 'ftp://ftp.free.fr/mirrors/ftp.gentoo.org/distfiles/2e/calibre-4.9.1.tar.xz'
--2020-02-06 18:04:59--  ftp://ftp.free.fr/mirrors/ftp.gentoo.org/distfiles/2e/calibre-4.9.1.tar.xz
           => '/usr/portage/distfiles/calibre-4.9.1.tar.xz.__download__'
Resolving ftp.free.fr... 212.27.60.27, 2a01:e0c:1:1598::1
Connecting to ftp.free.fr|212.27.60.27|:21... connected.
Logging in as anonymous ... Logged in!
==> SYST ... done.    ==> PWD ... done.
==> TYPE I ... done.  ==> CWD (1) /mirrors/ftp.gentoo.org/distfiles/2e ... done.
==> SIZE calibre-4.9.1.tar.xz ... 37529656
==> PASV ... done.    ==> RETR calibre-4.9.1.tar.xz ... done.
Length: 37529656 (36M) (unauthoritative)

calibre-4.9.1.tar.xz                       100%[========================================================================================>]  35.79M  5.53MB/s    in 8.0s    

2020-02-06 18:05:08 (4.48 MB/s) - '/usr/portage/distfiles/calibre-4.9.1.tar.xz.__download__' saved [37529656]

>>> Creating Manifest for /var/db/repos/my-local-portage/app-text/calibre

Fix the permissions with

chown -R portage:portage /var/db/repos/my-local-portage

The manifest file contains the hash of the ebuild file and all the additional files if any (for this package there are no additional files). All file needed for the operation will be downloaded so they must be network accessed in the time of executing the command (except in the cases when they have already existed in the distfiles directory and/or the subdirectories of the /var/db/repos/my-local-portage/app-text/calibre)
Keep on reading!

more than the default 4 parallel processes using distributed compiling with distcc

Distributed compilation could greatly speed the build process of Gentoo packages (and not only Gentoo, of course). If you tend to use Gentoo on a laptop or a relatively old CPU you may want to build packages distributively across multiple hosts.
Different (Linux) distributions use different configurations and environment scheme and sometimes it is difficult to sift the configuration, which could be applied to your setup. This is not a tutorial on how to enable parallel processing in Gentoo but it is just our client-site setup.

By default, there is a limit of 4 parallel processes, which is utterly insufficient, because nowadays most servers have more than 8 cores/logical compute units (not to mention that probably most would have 16 and above cores compute units).

The environment variable DISTCC_HOSTS controls, which hosts will receive files for the compilation of what they support and what is the limit of parallel processes.

In Gentoo we set this variable in the /etc/portage/make.conf. Here what you may include in make.conf to have 16 parallel remote processes and up to maximum 4 local (if the remote fails):

MAKEOPTS="-j16 -l4"
FEATURES="distcc"
DISTCC_HOSTS="192.168.0.101/16"

We use the environment DISTCC_HOSTS (here in Gentoo put in the make.conf, but in another Linux distribution an environment variable with this name should be set) because it is easy to set up and control globally for the Gentoo emerge system.
According to the documents:

In order, distcc looks in the $DISTCC_HOSTS environment variable, the user’s $DISTCC_DIR/hosts file, and the system-wide host file.

So when using emerge to build the packages, the emerge will rely on $DISTCC_HOSTS in make.conf (/etc/portage/make.conf or /etc/make.conf if you still use the old path), “/var/tmp/portage/.distcc/” (the build process uses “portage” user and group, not root!) and “/etc/distcc/hosts”. The first option used in the order above will be set the hosts and the limitation for the distributed processing. So if you use $DISTCC_HOSTS in make.conf (or environment) you wouldn’t need to set the “hosts” file.
Separate the different hosts with white space if you have more than one and always use the notation “/LIMIT” for each host. The default value is only 4 parallel processes (i.e it is implicitly added /4 to each hosts in the configuration!)
Keep on reading!

display packages from the Gentoo emerge resume list

A quick tip and an easy hack to see the emerge resume list, which will be used by the “emerge –resume” command. There are two resume lists – resume and resume_backup in the binary file /var/cache/edb/mtimedb.
The first two commands are python 3+.
The resume and resume_backup lists

python -c 'import portage; print(portage.mtimedb.get("resume", {}).get("mergelist"))'
python -c 'import portage; print(portage.mtimedb.get("resume_backup", {}).get("mergelist"))'

If you need the command for the python 2 you should use the following:

python -c 'import portage; print portage.mtimedb.get("resume", {}).get("mergelist")'
python -c 'import portage; print portage.mtimedb.get("resume_backup", {}).get("mergelist")'

Real world example

Resume list for

desktop ~ # emerge -v --nodeps $(qlist -IC|grep dev-qt)

These are the packages that would be merged, in order:

[ebuild     U  ] dev-qt/designer-5.14.0:5/5.14::gentoo [5.12.2:5/5.12::gentoo] USE="declarative webkit -debug -test" 8,493 KiB
[ebuild     U  ] dev-qt/linguist-tools-5.14.0:5/5.14::gentoo [5.12.2:5/5.12::gentoo] USE="qml -debug -test" 0 KiB
[ebuild     U  ] dev-qt/qdbus-5.14.0:5/5.14::gentoo [5.12.2:5/5.12::gentoo] USE="-debug -test" 0 KiB
[ebuild     U  ] dev-qt/qtbluetooth-5.14.0:5/5.14::gentoo [5.12.2:5/5.12::gentoo] USE="-debug -qml -test" 2,727 KiB
[ebuild   R    ] dev-qt/qtchooser-66::gentoo  USE="-test" 32 KiB
[ebuild     U  ] dev-qt/qtconcurrent-5.14.0:5/5.14::gentoo [5.12.2:5/5.12::gentoo] USE="-debug -test" 48,549 KiB
[ebuild     U  ] dev-qt/qtcore-5.14.0:5/5.14::gentoo [5.12.2:5/5.12::gentoo] USE="icu -debug (-systemd) -test" 0 KiB
[ebuild     U  ] dev-qt/qtdbus-5.14.0:5/5.14::gentoo [5.12.2:5/5.12::gentoo] USE="-debug -test" 0 KiB
[ebuild     U  ] dev-qt/qtdeclarative-5.14.0:5/5.14::gentoo [5.12.2:5/5.12::gentoo] USE="jit widgets -debug -gles2 -localstorage -test" 20,753 KiB
[ebuild     U  ] dev-qt/qtgraphicaleffects-5.14.0:5/5.14::gentoo [5.12.2:5/5.12::gentoo] USE="-debug -test" 13,713 KiB
[ebuild     U  ] dev-qt/qtgui-5.14.0-r1:5/5.14::gentoo [5.12.2:5/5.12::gentoo] USE="accessibility dbus egl evdev gif ibus jpeg libinput png udev vnc wayland%* xcb -debug -eglfs -gles2 -test -tslib -tuio" 0 KiB
[ebuild     U  ] dev-qt/qthelp-5.14.0:5/5.14::gentoo [5.12.2:5/5.12::gentoo] USE="-debug -test" 0 KiB
[ebuild     U  ] dev-qt/qtimageformats-5.14.0:5/5.14::gentoo [5.12.2:5/5.12::gentoo] USE="mng -debug -test (-jpeg2k%)" 1,768 KiB
[ebuild     U  ] dev-qt/qtlocation-5.14.0:5/5.14::gentoo [5.12.2:5/5.12::gentoo] USE="-debug -test" 5,974 KiB
[ebuild   R    ] dev-qt/qtlockedfile-2.4.1_p20171024::gentoo  USE="-doc" 694 KiB
[ebuild     U  ] dev-qt/qtmultimedia-5.14.0:5/5.14::gentoo [5.12.2:5/5.12::gentoo] USE="alsa gstreamer openal pulseaudio qml widgets -debug -gles2 -test" 3,671 KiB
[ebuild     U  ] dev-qt/qtnetwork-5.14.0:5/5.14::gentoo [5.12.2:5/5.12::gentoo] USE="libproxy networkmanager ssl -bindist -connman -debug -sctp -test" 0 KiB
[ebuild     U  ] dev-qt/qtopengl-5.14.0:5/5.14::gentoo [5.12.2:5/5.12::gentoo] USE="-debug -gles2 -test" 0 KiB
[ebuild     U  ] dev-qt/qtpaths-5.14.0:5/5.14::gentoo [5.12.2:5/5.12::gentoo] USE="-debug -test" 0 KiB
[ebuild     U  ] dev-qt/qtpositioning-5.14.0:5/5.14::gentoo [5.12.2:5/5.12::gentoo] USE="qml -debug -geoclue -test" 0 KiB
[ebuild     U  ] dev-qt/qtprintsupport-5.14.0-r1:5/5.14::gentoo [5.12.2:5/5.12::gentoo] USE="cups -debug -gles2 -test" 0 KiB
[ebuild     U  ] dev-qt/qtquickcontrols2-5.14.0:5/5.14::gentoo [5.12.2:5/5.12::gentoo] USE="-debug -test -widgets" 7,947 KiB
[ebuild     U  ] dev-qt/qtquickcontrols-5.14.0:5/5.14::gentoo [5.12.2:5/5.12::gentoo] USE="widgets -debug -test" 5,843 KiB
[ebuild     U  ] dev-qt/qtscript-5.14.0:5/5.14::gentoo [5.12.2:5/5.12::gentoo] USE="jit scripttools -debug -test" 2,584 KiB
[ebuild     U  ] dev-qt/qtsensors-5.14.0:5/5.14::gentoo [5.12.2:5/5.12::gentoo] USE="-debug -qml -test" 1,996 KiB
[ebuild   R    ] dev-qt/qtsingleapplication-2.6.1_p20171024::gentoo  USE="X -doc" 0 KiB
[ebuild     U  ] dev-qt/qtspeech-5.14.0:5/5.14::gentoo [5.12.2:5/5.12::gentoo] USE="-debug -test" 99 KiB
[ebuild     U  ] dev-qt/qtsql-5.14.0:5/5.14.0::gentoo [5.12.2:5/5.12.2::gentoo] USE="mysql sqlite -debug -freetds -oci8 -odbc -postgres -test" 0 KiB
[ebuild     U  ] dev-qt/qtsvg-5.14.0-r1:5/5.14::gentoo [5.12.2:5/5.12::gentoo] USE="-debug -test" 1,822 KiB
[ebuild     U  ] dev-qt/qttest-5.14.0:5/5.14::gentoo [5.12.2:5/5.12::gentoo] USE="-debug -test" 0 KiB
[ebuild     U  ] dev-qt/qttranslations-5.14.0:5/5.14::gentoo [5.12.2:5/5.12::gentoo] USE="-debug -test" 1,302 KiB
[ebuild     U  ] dev-qt/qtvirtualkeyboard-5.14.0:5/5.14::gentoo [5.12.2:5/5.12::gentoo] USE="spell xcb -debug -handwriting -test" 10,705 KiB
[ebuild     U  ] dev-qt/qtwayland-5.14.0:5/5.14::gentoo [5.12.2:5/5.12::gentoo] USE="libinput xcomposite -debug -test" 532 KiB
[ebuild     U  ] dev-qt/qtwebchannel-5.14.0:5/5.14::gentoo [5.12.2:5/5.12::gentoo] USE="qml -debug -test" 192 KiB
[ebuild     U  ] dev-qt/qtwebengine-5.14.0:5/5.14::gentoo [5.12.2:5/5.12::gentoo] USE="alsa pulseaudio system-icu widgets -bindist -debug -designer -jumbo-build -pax_kernel -system-ffmpeg -test (-geolocation%*)" 235,904 KiB
[ebuild     U  ] dev-qt/qtwebkit-5.212.0_pre20190629:5/5.212::gentoo [5.212.0_pre20180120:5/5.212::gentoo] USE="X geolocation hyphen jit multimedia opengl printsupport qml -gles2 -gstreamer -nsplugin -orientation -webp" 12,166 KiB
[ebuild     U  ] dev-qt/qtwidgets-5.14.0:5/5.14::gentoo [5.12.2:5/5.12::gentoo] USE="gtk png xcb -debug -gles2 -test" 0 KiB
[ebuild     U  ] dev-qt/qtx11extras-5.14.0:5/5.14::gentoo [5.12.2:5/5.12::gentoo] USE="-debug -test" 125 KiB
[ebuild     U  ] dev-qt/qtxml-5.14.0:5/5.14::gentoo [5.12.2:5/5.12::gentoo] USE="-debug -test" 0 KiB
[ebuild     U  ] dev-qt/qtxmlpatterns-5.14.0:5/5.14::gentoo [5.11.1:5/5.11::gentoo] USE="-debug -qml% -test" 1,362 KiB

Total: 40 packages (37 upgrades, 3 reinstalls), Size of downloads: 388,941 KiB


>>> Verifying ebuild manifests
>>> Running pre-merge checks for dev-qt/qtwebkit-5.212.0_pre20190629

>>> Emerging (1 of 40) dev-qt/designer-5.14.0::gentoo
 * Fetching files in the background.
 * To view fetch progress, run in another terminal:
 * tail -f /var/log/emerge-fetch.log
 * qttools-everywhere-src-5.14.0.tar.xz BLAKE2B SHA512 size ;-) ...                                                                                                  [ ok ]
!!! Failed to set new SELinux execution context. Is your current SELinux context allowed to run Portage?
>>> Unpacking source...
>>> Unpacking qttools-everywhere-src-5.14.0.tar.xz to /var/tmp/portage/dev-qt/designer-5.14.0/work
^C

Exiting on signal 2
sandbox:stop  caught signal 2 in pid 22886
sandbox:stop  Send signal 4 more times to force SIGKILL
Sandboxed process killed by signal: Interrupt
^C * The ebuild phase 'die_hooks' has been killed by signal 2.

 * Messages for package dev-qt/designer-5.14.0:

We interrupted it on purpose with Ctrl+C.

The output of the above python command:

desktop ~ # python -c 'import portage; print(portage.mtimedb.get("resume", {}).get("mergelist"))'
[['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/designer-5.14.0', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/linguist-tools-5.14.0', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/qdbus-5.14.0', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/qtbluetooth-5.14.0', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/qtchooser-66', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/qtconcurrent-5.14.0', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/qtcore-5.14.0', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/qtdbus-5.14.0', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/qtdeclarative-5.14.0', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/qtgraphicaleffects-5.14.0', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/qtgui-5.14.0-r1', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/qthelp-5.14.0', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/qtimageformats-5.14.0', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/qtlocation-5.14.0', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/qtlockedfile-2.4.1_p20171024', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/qtmultimedia-5.14.0', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/qtnetwork-5.14.0', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/qtopengl-5.14.0', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/qtpaths-5.14.0', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/qtpositioning-5.14.0', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/qtprintsupport-5.14.0-r1', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/qtquickcontrols2-5.14.0', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/qtquickcontrols-5.14.0', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/qtscript-5.14.0', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/qtsensors-5.14.0', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/qtsingleapplication-2.6.1_p20171024', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/qtspeech-5.14.0', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/qtsql-5.14.0', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/qtsvg-5.14.0-r1', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/qttest-5.14.0', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/qttranslations-5.14.0', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/qtvirtualkeyboard-5.14.0', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/qtwayland-5.14.0', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/qtwebchannel-5.14.0', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/qtwebengine-5.14.0', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/qtwebkit-5.212.0_pre20190629', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/qtwidgets-5.14.0', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/qtx11extras-5.14.0', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/qtxml-5.14.0', 'merge'], ['ebuild', '/', 'dev-qt/qtxmlpatterns-5.14.0', 'merge']]
desktop ~ # python -c 'import portage; print(portage.mtimedb.get("resume_backup", {}).get("mergelist"))'
None

rsync daemon in CentOS 8

Apparently, the team behind the CentOS 8 decided to split the rsync functionality to two packages – one for the client-side and for the server-side, despite the binary rsync is only one and offers the client-size and server-side.
So there two packages in CentOS 8:

  1. rsync – provides the client-side and server-side as usual
  2. rsync-daemon – provides configuration example file and the systemd to start it as a service.

So if you wonder where is your rsync service after installing the rsync package under CentOS 8 you must install additional package “rsync-daemon”.

Of course, you may just create anywhere “rsyncd.conf” (the best place for the configuration file is in /etc, but could be placed anywhere with “–config=PATH/FILE” option) file and start the daemon as usual with “–daemon” option included to have the rsync server-side up and running.

rsync --daemon --config=/etc/rsyncd.conf

Just create yourself the configuration “/etc/rsyncd.conf” file.

Install the rsync program – the client and the daemon

dnf install rsync

Install the configuration and systemd files

dnf install rsync-daemon

rsync and rsync-daemon files

The files included in the two packages:

[root@srv ~]# dnf repoquery -l rsync-daemon
Last metadata expiration check: 0:33:02 ago on Wed 22 Jan 2020 02:57:06 PM UTC.
/etc/rsyncd.conf
/etc/sysconfig/rsyncd
/usr/lib/systemd/system/rsyncd.service
/usr/lib/systemd/system/rsyncd.socket
/usr/lib/systemd/system/rsyncd@.service
/usr/share/man/man5/rsyncd.conf.5.gz
[root@srv ~]# dnf repoquery -l rsync
Last metadata expiration check: 0:33:06 ago on Wed 22 Jan 2020 02:57:06 PM UTC.
/usr/bin/rsync
/usr/lib/.build-id
/usr/lib/.build-id/6e
/usr/lib/.build-id/6e/bdbf5032a966a6293cea003621ba766ab36ff1
/usr/share/doc/rsync
/usr/share/doc/rsync/NEWS
/usr/share/doc/rsync/OLDNEWS
/usr/share/doc/rsync/README
/usr/share/doc/rsync/support
/usr/share/doc/rsync/support/Makefile
/usr/share/doc/rsync/support/atomic-rsync
/usr/share/doc/rsync/support/cvs2includes
/usr/share/doc/rsync/support/deny-rsync
/usr/share/doc/rsync/support/file-attr-restore
/usr/share/doc/rsync/support/files-to-excludes
/usr/share/doc/rsync/support/git-set-file-times
/usr/share/doc/rsync/support/instant-rsyncd
/usr/share/doc/rsync/support/logfilter
/usr/share/doc/rsync/support/lsh
/usr/share/doc/rsync/support/lsh.sh
/usr/share/doc/rsync/support/mapfrom
/usr/share/doc/rsync/support/mapto
/usr/share/doc/rsync/support/mnt-excl
/usr/share/doc/rsync/support/munge-symlinks
/usr/share/doc/rsync/support/rrsync
/usr/share/doc/rsync/support/rsync-no-vanished
/usr/share/doc/rsync/support/rsync-slash-strip
/usr/share/doc/rsync/support/rsyncstats
/usr/share/doc/rsync/support/savetransfer.c
/usr/share/doc/rsync/tech_report.tex
/usr/share/licenses/rsync
/usr/share/licenses/rsync/COPYING
/usr/share/man/man1/rsync.1.gz

KDE Plasma windows force resize – iKVM virtual keyboard

If you happen to use KDE Plasma these days and you encounter view problems like you cannot see the whole viewpoint of a window (especially JAVA/GTK based programs?).

KDE Plasma Desktop offers the ability to force a window to expand to new dimensions.

STEP 1) The Java-based iKVM program window has a handful virtual keyboard.

It could be used to “click on” specific key combinations, which otherwise could be caught by your system. But in sometimes the virtual keyboad window is trimmed and you lose some important keys like Ctrl, Alt, Space, arrow keys and more (the last line of buttons).

main menu
iKVM virtual keyboard trimmed keys

Keep on reading!

Remove disk (all partitions) from software RAID1 with mdadm and change layout of the disk

The following article is to show how to remove healthy partitions from software RAID1 devices to change the layout of the disk and then add them back to the array.
The mdadm is the tool to manipulate the software RAID devices under Linux and it is part of all Linux distributions (some don’t install it by default so it may need to be installed).

Software RAID layout

[root@srv ~]# cat /proc/mdstat 
Personalities : [raid1] 
md125 : active raid1 sda4[1] sdb3[0]
      1047552 blocks super 1.2 [2/2] [UU]
      bitmap: 0/1 pages [0KB], 65536KB chunk

md126 : active raid1 sdb2[0] sda3[1]
      32867328 blocks super 1.2 [2/2] [UU]
      
md127 : active raid1 sda2[1] sdb1[0]
      52427776 blocks super 1.2 [2/2] [UU]
      bitmap: 0/1 pages [0KB], 65536KB chunk

unused devices: <none>

STEP 1) Make the partitions faulty.

The partitions cannot be removed if they are not faulty.

[root@srv ~]# mdadm --fail /dev/md125 /dev/sdb3
mdadm: set /dev/sdb3 faulty in /dev/md125
[root@srv ~]# mdadm --fail /dev/md126 /dev/sdb2
mdadm: set /dev/sdb2 faulty in /dev/md126
[root@srv ~]# mdadm --fail /dev/md127 /dev/sdb1
mdadm: set /dev/sdb1 faulty in /dev/md127

Keep on reading!

Build docker image with custom Dockerfile name – docker build requires exactly 1 argument

Docker uses the Dockerfile to build docker images, but what if you want to change the name and (or) the path of this file?
By default “docker build” command uses a file named Dockerfile on the same directory you execute the “docker build“. There is an option to change the path and name of this special file:

  -f, --file string             Name of the Dockerfile (Default is 'PATH/Dockerfile')

And the “-f” may include path and file name but it is mandatory to specify the path at the end “docker build” usually the current directory (context by the docker terminology) by adding “.” (the dot at the end of the command)

So if you want to build with a docker file mydockerfile in the current directory you must execute:

docker build -f mydockerfile .

If your file is in a sub-directory execute:

docker build -f subdirectory/mydockerfile .

The command will create a docker image in your local repository. Here is the output of the first command:

root@srv:~/docker# docker build -f mydockerfile .
Sending build context to Docker daemon  2.048kB
Step 1/3 : FROM ubuntu:bionic-20191029
bionic-20191029: Pulling from library/ubuntu
7ddbc47eeb70: Pull complete 
c1bbdc448b72: Pull complete 
8c3b70e39044: Pull complete 
45d437916d57: Pull complete 
Digest: sha256:6e9f67fa63b0323e9a1e587fd71c561ba48a034504fb804fd26fd8800039835d
Status: Downloaded newer image for ubuntu:bionic-20191029
 ---> 775349758637
Step 2/3 : MAINTAINER test@example.com
 ---> Running in 5fa42bca749c
Removing intermediate container 5fa42bca749c
 ---> 0a1ffa1728f4
Step 3/3 : RUN apt-get update && apt-get upgrade -y && apt-get install -y git wget
 ---> Running in 2e35040f247c
Get:1 http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu bionic-security InRelease [88.7 kB]
Get:2 http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu bionic InRelease [242 kB]
Get:3 http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu bionic-updates InRelease [88.7 kB]
Get:4 http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu bionic-backports InRelease [74.6 kB]
.....
.....
Processing triggers for ca-certificates (20180409) ...
Updating certificates in /etc/ssl/certs...
0 added, 0 removed; done.
Running hooks in /etc/ca-certificates/update.d...
done.
Removing intermediate container 2e35040f247c
 ---> 2382809739a4
Successfully built 2382809739a4

Here is the image:

REPOSITORY                            TAG                 IMAGE ID            CREATED              SIZE
root@srv:~# docker images
<none>                                <none>              2382809739a4        About a minute ago   186MB

Build command with custom name and registry URL and TAG

root@srv:~# docker build -t gitlab.ahelpme.com:4567/root/ubuntu-project/ubuntu18-manual-base:v0.1 -f mydockerfile .
Sending build context to Docker daemon  2.048kB
Step 1/3 : FROM ubuntu:bionic-20191029
 ---> 775349758637
Step 2/3 : MAINTAINER test@example.com
 ---> Using cache
 ---> 0a1ffa1728f4
Step 3/3 : RUN apt-get update && apt-get upgrade -y && apt-get install -y git wget
 ---> Using cache
 ---> 2382809739a4
Successfully built 2382809739a4
Successfully tagged gitlab.ahelpme.com:4567/root/ubuntu-project/ubuntu18-manual-base:v0.1
root@srv:~# docker push gitlab.ahelpme.com:4567/root/ubuntu-project/ubuntu18-manual-base:v0.1
The push refers to repository [gitlab.ahelpme.com:4567/root/ubuntu-project/ubuntu18-manual-base]
7cebba4bf6c3: Pushed 
e0b3afb09dc3: Pushed 
6c01b5a53aac: Pushed 
2c6ac8e5063e: Pushed 
cc967c529ced: Pushed 
v0.1: digest: sha256:acf42078bf46e320c402f09c6417a3dae8992ab4f4f685265486063daf30cb13 size: 1364

the registry URL is “gitlab.ahelpme.com:4567” and the project path is “/root/ubuntu-project/” and the name of the image is “ubuntu18-manual-base” with tag “v0.1“. The build command uses the cache from our first build example here (because the docker file is the same).

Typical errors with “-f”

Two errors you may encounter when trying the “-f” to change the name of the default Dockerfile name:

$ docker build -t gitlab.ahelpme.com:4567/root/ubuntu-project/ubuntu18-manual-base:v0.1 -f mydockerfile subdirectory/
unable to prepare context: unable to evaluate symlinks in Dockerfile path: lstat /builds/dev/docker-containers/mydockerfile: no such file or directory

$ docker build -t gitlab.ahelpme.com:4567/root/ubuntu-project/ubuntu18-manual-base:v0.1 -f subdirectory/mydockerfile
"docker build" requires exactly 1 argument.
See 'docker build --help'.

Usage:  docker build [OPTIONS] PATH | URL | -

First, you might think the -f would take the path and file name and this should be enough, but the errors above appears!

Our example Dockerfile

This is our simple example docker file:

FROM ubuntu:bionic-20191029
MAINTAINER test@example.com

RUN apt-get update && apt-get upgrade -y && apt-get install -y git wget

We are using the official docker image from Ubuntu. Always use official docker images!

nano – Error opening terminal: unknown under chroot or (docker) container

A quick tip for GNU Nano – the text editor. Ever receiving the terminal error when using nano?

[root@srv ~]# nano                                                        
Error opening terminal: unknown.
[root@srv ~]#

Under chroot or container (like docker) environment try exporting the TERM environment:

export TERM=linux

And then execute nano the chances are you will enter nano normally and do your work (faster than vim 🙂 )?

You may use it without exporting to your shell, but just the for the nano:

TERM=linux nano

Save iptables rules over reboots on Ubuntu 16 and Ubuntu 18 – persistent iptables rules

Moving towards the firewalld software and especially the systemd some good old init scripts got missing! For example, one of those good scripts is the init script for iptables firewall, which allows saving iptables rules and during boot, it loads them again. With the init iptables script we have persistence of the iptables rules. Meanwhile, we can always call the init script with “save” argument to update the currently saved rules. Many different Linux distributions have this init script – “/etc/init.d/iptables”, but in systemd world, it has been removed and replaced with nothing (probably, because you are encouraged to use firewalld, which is not a bad thing!).

There are two packages “iptables-persistent” and “netfilter-persistent”, which work together to have iptables persistence over reboots. The rules are saved and restored automatically during system startup.

First, install “iptables-persistent” and “netfilter-persistent” with

sudo apt install netfilter-persistent iptables-persistent

During the iptables–persistent installation the setup asks the user to save the current iptables rules. Hit “Yes” if you want to save the current iptables rules, which will be automatically loaded the next time the system starts up.

main menu
Configuring iptables-persistent setup

So it is safe to install it on a live system – the current iptables rules won’t be deleted.
Second, ensure the boot script to restore the iptables rules is enabled

sudo systemctl enable netfilter-persistent

Additional information

Saving the current state of the iptables rules:

myuser@myubuntupc:~$ sudo /usr/sbin/netfilter-persistent save
run-parts: executing /usr/share/netfilter-persistent/plugins.d/15-ip4tables save
run-parts: executing /usr/share/netfilter-persistent/plugins.d/25-ip6tables save

Restore the original state of the iptables rules:

sudo systemctl restart netfilter-persistent

And all commands you can do – start, stop, restart, reload, flush, save. You can use the script directly (it is not mandatory to use systemctl to restart, i.e. restore rules and etc.)

myuser@myubuntupc:~$ sudo /usr/sbin/netfilter-persistent
Usage: /usr/sbin/netfilter-persistent (start|stop|restart|reload|flush|save)

The script netfilter-persistent executes 2 other scripts as plugins:

/usr/share/netfilter-persistent/plugins.d/15-ip4tables
/usr/share/netfilter-persistent/plugins.d/25-ip6tables

The iptables rules are saved respectively in files

/etc/iptables/rules.v4
/etc/iptables/rules.v6

And you can always edit them manually or save/restore with iptables-save and iptables-restore redirecting the output to the above files.

It’s normal the state of the “active (exited)”. The service is “enabled” as you can see (by default the setup automatically enables the service on Ubuntu, but always check it to be sure, it’s the firewall!).

myuser@myubuntupc:~$ sudo systemctl status netfilter-persistent
● netfilter-persistent.service - netfilter persistent configuration
   Loaded: loaded (/lib/systemd/system/netfilter-persistent.service; enabled; vendor preset: enabled)
   Active: active (exited) since Thu 2019-01-17 20:44:08 EST; 14min ago
 Main PID: 666 (code=exited, status=0/SUCCESS)
   CGroup: /system.slice/netfilter-persistent.service

Jan 17 20:44:08 myubuntupc systemd[1]: Starting netfilter persistent configuration...
Jan 17 20:44:08 myubuntupc netfilter-persistent[666]: run-parts: executing /usr/share/netfilter-persistent/plugins.d/15-ip4tables start
Jan 17 20:44:08 myubuntupc netfilter-persistent[666]: run-parts: executing /usr/share/netfilter-persistent/plugins.d/25-ip6tables start
Jan 17 20:44:08 myubuntupc systemd[1]: Started netfilter persistent configuration.