Review of freshly installed Fedora 36 Xcfe Desktop

After the tutorial of how to install Fedora 36 Xfce Desktop this tutorial is mainly to see what to expect from a freshly installed Fedora 36 Xfce Desktop – the look and feel of the new Xfce GUI (Xfce version – 4.16). The Fedora 36 Xfce Desktop is part of Fedora spins – https://spins.fedoraproject.org/xfce/
Here you can find how to Install Fedora 36 Xfce Desktop.
The idea of this article is just to see what to expect from Fedora 36 Xfce – the look and feel of the GUI, the default installed programs and their look and how to do some basic steps with them. Here you’ll find more than 130 screenshots and not so many texts we do not want to turn this review of many texts and version information and 3 meaningless screenshots, which you could not see anything for the user interface because these days it is the primary goal of a Desktop system. You can expect more of this kind of review in the future.
This article is the first part of reviewing the Fedora 36 Xfce Desktop. The second article contains Xfce Settings screenshots and it is coming soon.

Xfce is a collection of programs, which together provides a features-rich desktop environment.

Here are some core elements:

  • Window Manager (xfwm4) – Handles the placement of windows on the screen.
  • Panel (xfce4-panel) – Provides a home for window buttons, launchers, app menu and more.
  • Desktop Manager (xfdesktop) – Sets desktop backgrounds, handles icons and more.
  • File Manager (thunar) – Manages your files in a modern, easy-to-use and fast way.
  • Volume Manager (thunar-volman) – Manages removable drives and media for Thunar.
  • Session Manager (xfce-session) – Saves and restores your session, handles startup, autostart and shutdown.
  • Setting System (xfce3-settings) – Configures appearance, display, keyboard, and mouse settings.
  • Application Finder (xfce4-appfinder) – Quickly finds and launches applications installed on your system
  • Settings Daemon (xfconf) – Stores your settings in a D-Bus-based configuration system.
  • A Menu Library (garcon) – Implements a freedesktp.org compliant menu based on GLib and GIO.
  • Thumbnails Services (tumbler) – Implements the thumbnails management D-Bus specification.

Fedora 36 Xfce screenshots

SCREENSHOT 1) Fedora (5.17.5-300.fc36.x86_64) 36 (Xfce)

main menu
grub 2 entry boot

Keep on reading!

Install Fedora 36 Xfce Desktop

This article will show the simple steps of installing a modern Linux Distribution like Fedora 36 Xfce Desktop with Xfce for the user graphical interface – one of the alternatives, which tries to break the domination of Gnome and partly KDE Plasma. First, it is offered the basic steps for installing the Operating system and then there are some screenshots of the installed system and the look and feel of it. Here is another article available with more screenshots of the installed and working Fedora 36 Xfce DesktopReview of freshly installed Fedora 36 Xcfe Desktop.
Xfce offers fast, easy and lightweight graphical environment for Linux systems and Fedora teams brings it out-of-the-box with their spins projects – Fedora Xfce Spin
This is the simplest set up. One hard disk device in the system is installed, which is detected as sda and the entire disk will be used for the installation of Fedora 36 Xfce Desktop. All disk information in sda disk device will be permanently deleted by the installation wizard!

The Fedora 36 Xfce Desktop comes with:

  • Xorg X server – 1.20.14 XWayland is used by default
  • linux kernel – 5.17.5
  • Xfce: 4.16, which is the latest stable as of the official Xfce site.

For more packages versions information check out the Fedora 36 server articles – Software and technical details of Fedora Server 36 including cockpit screenshots and Software comparison Ubuntu server 22.04 LTS vs Fedora 36 server edition – head-to-head.

We used the following ISO for the installation process:
https://download.fedoraproject.org/pub/fedora/linux/releases/36/Spins/x86_64/iso/Fedora-Xfce-Live-x86_64-36-1.5.iso
It is a LIVE image so you can try it before installing it. The easiest way is just to download the image and burn it to a DVD disk or USB stick and then follow the installation below:

SCREENSHOT 1) Boot from the UEFI DVD-ROM device.

It is the same with the USB bootable removable drive. Choose the UEFI USB drive and boot the installation live drive.

main menu
UEFI BIOS DVD-ROM boot

Keep on reading!

Gentoo update tips when updating packages with blocks and masked files

It’s not so rear to have

blocks or masked files

when using Gentoo emerge system, but it is not complex and in most cases it is easy to resolve

To summarize it up at the beginning and then we are going to show you other articles using these advises here where you’ll see what are the steps we took to resolve the conflicts and masked packages:

  • Use verbose,verbose-conflicts and backtrack with emerge
  • Remove only big GUI packages, which have really big dependency graph like office suites or development IDEs
  • Remove obsolete packages – you do not need them, they can just make problems when updating, because emerge will take into consideration their requirements and dependencies and your update could be impossible!
  • Do not update everything with one line, you could update only the base libraries like QT, which are very important for the Linux GUI in general
  • Include explicitly packages, which block our updates in the emerge line! You could specify packages with the versions.
  • use tools like “equery” (part of app-portage/gentoolkit) for checking dependencies and/or which packages depend on the queried package. You can use it with specific version for the package. “qlist” (part of app-portage/portage-utils) also is a handful tool.
  • Sometimes when updating a group or a package with big dependency graph it is much easier to drop the -“u” update argument and to rebuild some packages with the updates.
  • In rear cases you can use “–nodeps” when updating or installing a new package (we do not need and show this one here!)
  • Do NOT rebuild the entire system with “emerge -v world” every time when you rebuild glibc, gcc, it is not mandatory to do it to have a healthy system.
  • Add or remove USE flags if needed – emerge will show you information about it. Use package.use, package.mask, package.unmask and so on.
  • use qlist to update/re(build) to pull currently installed packages with some name or category (categories)
    emerge -v $(qlist -IC|grep <NAME>)
    

    and for update just add “u” to “-v”:

    emerge -vu $(qlist -IC|grep <NAME>)
    

Keep on reading!